Book Versus Movie-Coraline

Book vs MovieI’ve been a fan of the movie Coraline for years, but it was only recently that I came across the book, the glory of now living in a town with a bookstore. I have to say that I loved the book as much as the movie, though there are differences between the two.

In the movie, Coraline moves into an old house that has been divided into apartments. This is the same in the book. However, in the movie the house is owned by the grandmother of one Wybie, a strange little boy who gives Coraline a doll that looks just like her. In the book, Wybie and the doll don’t exist.

In both the book and the movie, Coraline’s parents are too busy to entertain her, so she’s forced to take care of herself. This leads to finding a small door with a brick wall behind it. Coraline’s mother tells her it’s there because the house was made into apartments.

In the book, the drawing room is described as a nice room where no one can sit on the furniture. In the movie, however, there’s little in there, and the room is depressing.

In the book, Coraline goes through the door and down a tunnel while her mother is at the store getting groceries. This isn’t the case in the movie. In the movie, Coraline first goes down the tunnel in a dream. Here she meets her ‘other mother’ and has a wonderful meal which seriously outshines her father’s cooking. In the book, she looks around the ‘other’ world and decides it’s too weird. After a brief first visit, she goes home. It is only when she gets bored waiting for her mother that she returns for the meal.

The interactions with the neighbors seem to follow pretty closely together for the book and movie. There are some minor detail differences but not many. It is only when Coraline returns to her world and discovers her parents aren’t home that the differences begin again.

In the book, Coraline does things like eat frozen pizza for dinner, watch TV, and take a bubble bath. When she wakes up in the middle of the night and sees the cat, she asks if it knows where her parents are. The cats only leads her to the hall mirror where her parents write ‘help us’ on the other side. They’re trapped in it. In the movie, there’s no sign of a TV, and there’s no food in the house. Coraline knows immediately that her parents have been taken, and she doesn’t call the police. Instead, she returns to the ‘other’ world.

There’s a good bit of similarity between the book and the movie during Coraline’s competition with the Beldam. In both, she spends time with the ‘other’ neighbors and seeks the souls of the trapped ghosts. The biggest difference here is that the souls are referred to as ‘eyes’ in the movie and ‘souls’ in the book.

Once Coraline has defeated the Beldam and rescued her parents, she must get rid of the Beldam’s hand, which follows her back to the real world. In the book, she has a tea party with her dolls, and the hand falls into the well. In the movie, Wybie helps her throw the hand down the well.

All in all, both the book and the movie are well done, and both are worth the experience.
 

Dealing with Stories You Hate

landing-page-websiteThose who’ve followed along know that I’ve been posting a “The Little Mermaid” like tale for the past few Sundays. Obviously, I’ve pulled that tale, but there’s a reason for it.

I hate it. I mean I really, really hate the story. I don’t like the girl trying to change herself to get the guy, even though, let’s face it, most of us have done it at one time or another, especially when we were young. I hate the attitude of the dwarves, self-righteous little pricks that they are. I hate the fact that I have no idea where it’s going, and I hate the writing. I hate every single thing about the story.

As an author, sometimes we have to kill our babies, whether we want to or not. It can be painful sometimes, but, other times, it’s a justifiable homicide. That’s what it was with the tale that I pulled. Completely justifiable.

Does that mean I won’t revisit the story at some later date and see if it’s salvageable. Well…actually…I probably won’t. I have so many ideas going and so many projects in the works, that the likelihood of ever having time to go back and look at it is small. But I don’t mourn it. I don’t mourn letting the tale go.

Are there any of your stories that you decided just weren’t worth the time needed to turn them into something readable? Did you feel like you were letting yourself down when you let them go? Leave an answer in the comments.

Best wishes!

Lissa Dobbs

http://www.lissadobbs.com

Lethatu…Oops.

Ravyn's LetterI’m one of those people who loves to create worlds, and when I create a world, I want to create all of it. I want maps of everything, cultures to inhabit it, stories, history, religion, magic, and language. And I was well on my way to having all of that.

Then I moved.

Somehow, in the process of moving, the notebook I had written the grammar rules and such in disappeared. It’s a loss, I’ll agree, but it also gives me the opportunity to make some changes to the language and make it more in line with what I want it to be. To that effect, I’m not mourning the loss of the notebook. Instead, I’m going to begin at the beginning and make something that was better than the original. The only down side I can see is that the letter Ravyn Grimsbane left to her daughter Gwennyth will have to be a dialect not spoken anywhere else. But that’s okay, too.

What aspects of world-building are your favorite? Do you relish the opportunity to make changes? Feel free to comment.

Best wishes!

Lissa Dobbs

http://www.lissadobbs.com

Getting Settled Update

2017052295133200_2 (2)The last couple of months have been a bit nuts with my youngest graduating and us moving to another state, one we’d never even visited, but I think most of the craziness is finished, and we’re settling down. I’m hoping this will mean I can get back to writing and getting some kind of regular schedule for the blog.

One of the things I would like to do is work on a new story a bit at a time. This is a YA story with a plot similar to The Little Mermaid, or at least the general idea. You guys will get it in its raw, unvarnished form and are free to comment and make suggestions. I’m also thinking about tossing out a choose your own adventure kind of story. Would anyone be interested in that? Please comment if so.

Any other suggestions of what you would like to see here would be appreciated.

As always, best wishes!

Lissa Dobbs

http://www.lissadobbs.com

 

Character Thoughts – Ethan Grimley III

SPOILERS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

final-cover-with-bookThose who’ve read The Chronicles of Ethan Grimley III know that Ethan can be a bit strong-willed. He also has a certain disregard for the rules when it suits him, especially when he thinks he’s doing the right thing. The first time we see this is in A Walker is Born when Ethan skips school and disobeys his mother to check on Damion. Needless to say, his mother has four kinds of hissy fits, but Ethan just jumps right back at her. After all, he doesn’t understand why she worries so much about him. In Cronus Attacks Ethan takes off out the door when the Shadow Walker guild hall is attacked even though the students are ordered to remain indoors. He does it again when Faylen is taken, and it is because of Ethan and his friends that Cronus is defeated.

Much of Ethan’s behavior can be chalked up to childhood recklessness. From the perspective of an adult who’s raised three boys, I can understand how the adults around Ethan would want to keep him and the others safe. They’re children after all. On the other hand, I wonder if we keep our children too safe, keep them too shielded from the world around them. We have this idea that everyone gets a trophy and that no one should fail, but is this fair to the kids? Do they benefit from being raised in this environment?

From a parental perspective, I can understand not wanting your child to carry the weapon of a god, and I can understand wanting to keep him safe. Mine are grown, but come for them. I dare you. However, I can also see the wisdom of letting the children figure things out for themselves. I can understand how Ethan would feel that he was capable of handling the situation himself because I felt like I knew what I was doing at that age. (Doesn’t mean I did know, but I felt like I did.) I was quite capable of analyzing a situation and deciding on a course of action. I didn’t need someone standing over me telling me what to do every minute of every day. In fact, what I needed more than anything was for folks to back off and let me figure it out.

I think this is one of the things I try to portray with Ethan and his friends. The decisions Ethan has to make are his and his alone. No one can tell him whether to accept Gaia’s gift or not, and determining how to fight an enemy that is coming for him is knowledge he needs to have. You don’t get it in the classroom, regardless of what the subject is. I’m surely not encouraging students to skip school and the like, but I think there are times when we, as adults, need to back off and let them figure it out. Our children need to be able to enter the adult world knowing they can handle it. Will that happen if we hold their hands until they’re thirty? Do we want them to go out into the world frozen as Electa is so much of the time?

How much freedom of decision do you think children should have?

http://www.lissadobbs.com

Book vs. Movie – Bedknobs and Broomsticks

IMG_20170430_215322Contains spoilers!!!!!!!!!!!

 

The movie Bedknobs and Broomsticks starred Angela Lansbury. It was one of my favorites growing up and being able to get it on DVD was a highlight of my life. I love it! Then and now. I love the darkness and mystery and, of course, the magic. The search for the last spell so Miss Price can save England from the Nazis, the travel into the children’s story by riding a bed…there’s just something comforting, maybe a reminder of simpler times, about it. Granted, some of the songs are a little hokey, and, by today’s standards the effects are horrible. Still…

I finally got around to getting and reading the book, and I have to say that I love it, too, though it is almost nothing like the movie.

The book, written by Mary Norton, is actually two stories, The Magic Bedknob and Bonfires and Broomsticks.

In the first book, Carey, Charles, and Paul are staying with their Aunt Beatrice for summer vacation while their mother works. They meet Miss Price, who’s studying to become a wicked witch, and failing, and she gives them the bedknob. From there, they travel to a London police station and an island full of cannibals. At the end of the story, they return home for the school year.

The second book picks up two years later. Aunt Beatrice has died, and the mother is looking for someone to watch them for the summer. Miss Price has put an advertisement in the paper for children to watch, so they are reunited with their friend. Miss Price has given up magic, but the children convince her to use the bedknob anyway. They travel back in time where they meet Mr. Jones. He is a failed magician who returns to the present with them. After a few weeks, Mr. Jones returns home where he is almost burned at the stake.

In the movie, the story takes place during WWII, and the children are orphans who are evacuated and placed with Miss Price against any of their wills. They are somewhat rude children and not averse to blackmailing Miss Price to keep her secret. In the book, Carey, Charles, and Paul are simply being babysat for the summer, and they are much nicer all around. There is no mention of a war or a need to protect the children.

Their adventures are also much different. In the movie, they travel to London to locate Professor Emelius Brown, a charlatan who has a ‘college’ of witchcraft, to find the final piece of a spell Miss Price needs to protect England. From there, they go to a fictional island inhabited by animals then back to England to save their town from invasion. The only rescuing being done in the book is of Mr. Jones. After all, they can’t leave him to burn.

It’s hard to say which one is better. In many ways, it’s difficult to see the book and the movie as the same story. The bedknob is important, of course, and most of the characters are the same, but that’s where the similarity ends. It’s really easy to see them as completely distinct from each other. I think this is a good thing in a lot of ways, for it prevents the disappointment that comes from one being better than the other or key points being changed. (I’m sure we all have a list of movies a mile long to complain about.)

What do you think? Have you experienced both?

Lissa Dobbs

http://www.lissadobbs.com

 

The Demons of Moirena

IMG_20170422_165301The lands of Grevared are home to beings of all races. The Xaggarene Empire is primarily human, and it is the place of least tolerance of others. E’ma Thalas is home to the elves, fairies, and similar beings. Corleon is primarily human, but it is a tolerant place and has its share of Halflings. The Kingdom of Emerell is almost exclusively dwarven, and they have no desire for others to live among them, though a few Halflings call the land home. The southern half of Moirena is mostly human, but the northern half is inhabited by the demons, demons of all kinds and from all hells.

Our lore is full of references to demons.

There’s Asag from Sumerian mythology, a demon so hideous he’s said to cause fish to boil in his presence. His allies are the rocks of the mountains, and he’s best known from The Epic of Anzu and his defeat by the god Ninurta, using his mace Sharur.

Others come from Judeo-Christian mythology and are well-known, not only from the sacred texts, but also from popular culture. After all, who hasn’t seen The Exorcist? And we can’t forget the texts of old such as Daemonologie of King James I.

The demons of Grevared, however, aren’t allowed the luxury of their own plane, and it isn’t a place where live beings can posses others. The demons of Moirena have physical bodies just as the humans do. They have had to adapt to living with other beings, whether they like it or not, and many have developed a culture all their own. There is the Academe of Jitradena, which is known as one of the best universities in Grevared. This is one place where other species are allowed to exist unhindered, mostly, though, in truth, the demons would much rather the others simply leave them be. Ilkorenthatas, a demon from Pistonicle, was the first to develop the technology that allowed travel through the void, so there have been some benefits to all races for having the demons present.

But they are still demons.

While cities like Jitradena may be civilized in comparison to the way the demon realms are portrayed in most popular culture, it is still home to demons, and, as such, a place where death and dismemberment are common. Even the professors of the Academe long for a return to the old ways and want to dominate the other species, for they view them as nothing more than food. Laws exist, but these are mere guidelines, and a body lying in the street is likely to be eaten by the one who killed it. Cities such as Pistofficle don’t even pretend to bow to human convention, and demons regularly battle for power over their brethren.

Their holidays are no different. There are some who celebrate Yuletide and the like, but they consider this a time of mourning rather than a happy time. There are other demon holidays, or there will be once I figure out what they are, but they aren’t celebrations humans, especially those in our world, would want to attend.

All that being said, treaties have been made between the demons and the other species which allow peace of a sort to be maintained, and it is rare for the demons to venture into southern Moirena or cross the mountains into The Kingdom of Emerell. Be warned, thought, that their recipes are not for the faint of heart.

With the invention of the Cold Box, even demons now have a way to keep their food cold, and one of their favorite treats is ice cream. Those with a squeamish stomach or tender sensibilities may want to stop here.

The most popular of all ice creams is that containing bits and pieces of dead creatures, with human being preferred. When this isn’t available, other creatures will do.

Now, in our world, it’s frowned upon to make ice cream out of fairies and the like, but if you have a twisted sense of humor, there is a recipe that is perfectly acceptable, if a little odd.

Bunny Chunk Ice Cream

1 pint heavy whipping cream

1 can condensed milk

vanilla

1 package caramel

1 hollow chocolate bunny

red, blue, and green food coloring

several large marshmallows

powdered sugar

Break the chocolate bunny into small pieces, keeping parts of the head intact. Set aside.

Pour the whipping cream into a bowl and whip it until it is nice and thick. This will take several minutes, and it is done when the ripples remain. Add the vanilla and the condensed milk and whip again until the ripples remain.

Melt the marshmallows in the microwave. Add a bit of red, blue, and green food coloring until it has a sickly gray color. Add powdered sugar until it is thick enough to mold. Mold the marshmallows into entrail shapes.

Melt the caramels in a double boiler and add some red food coloring. Fold into the ice cream. Add the marshmallow entrails and the bits of chocolate rabbit. Keep the face pieces out. Fold carefully so that colors don’t smear.

Pour into a container suitable for freezing. Place the face pieces on top. Add drops of red food coloring near the face pieces and other bits that are on top. This will help the ice cream “bleed”.

Freeze overnight.

Similar recipes can be used around Halloween when the gummy body parts are sold. For this one, we usually make the ice cream green.

This is also good chocolate flavored. Simply add cocoa powder to taste when mixing the ice cream.

Lissa Dobbs

http://www.lissadobbs.com

 

Author Spotlight – S. A. Hoag

Renegades: Book 2 of The Wildblood

by S. A. Hoag

 

They made you strong, and smart. We kept you safe, and in the shadows. It took them damned near twenty years to find you. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Uncontrollable. Unpredictable. Dangerous. The Wildblood. Now, Team Three know what they are. Renegades: Book 2 of The Wildblood – Autumn 2016

 

M3

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Excerpt

“This is one of three air bursts,” Vance said, indicating the video monitor. It was recording as the airplane banked around to give them a clear view. “It happened early that morning, just before nine. It was a Tuesday. The other detonations were east and south, one directly over downtown Denver, the third at the airport, all within minutes a few minutes.”  He remembered clearly, but recited it like he was reading from a textbook. None of the others were old enough to remember.

 

The first group of buildings were isolated and more than that, destroyed. Melted, irradiated, and nothing that remained looked like it had ever been occupied by a human being. They were twisted and misshapen, matte gray against the distant blue mountains.

 

“Rocky Flats,” Shannon said carefully, concentrating. There were no ghosts, no impressions of the past, crowding into her thoughts. She was glad for that. Being Gen En, genetically enhanced, she could see things not so obvious to others. This place was empty, it was. . . null. The war had been twenty years ago, the voices faded. Now civilization consisted of tiny enclaves, hidden away and carefully guarded against other remnants of humanity. Her home, The Vista, was one of those places.   Vance’s city, Estes Park, was another.

 

“Anything?” Green asked, aware of the possible consequences if she sensed something unusual. He’d been her second, her backup, for years. Today he was piloting, as well.

 

She wrinkled her nose, distracted. “No, nothing that merits mention.”  Flying was an aversion, one she hadn’t been able to avoid recently. They were far from home, wary guests of Vance’s these past few months.

 

“What does that mean?” Cooper asked, the first thing he’d actually had to say during the journey. He’d taken the seat behind Vance and kept to himself. That was his job, to make sure Vance stayed safe and out of trouble. The Vistans were trouble. There were only a few of them, but they were a dangerous few.

 

“It means, she doesn’t see anything we can’t see,” Green offered. He wasn’t Gen En. He was Siksika, a Blackfoot, and a misplaced Vista Security officer, like her. Being her bodyguard, at least for a couple hours, was a duty Green didn’t mind. Capt. Allen, Shannon, was younger, more adept at controlling tricky situations, and his senior officer. Their relationship was far less complicated than most people believed.

 

Vance nodded. He’d been in charge of Estes Park for a decade. The areas south could be troublesome. Most of what had been central Colorado was under his protection, but there was a large and empty landscape where Denver had been. Even the scavengers kept clear. The Vistans and his people weren’t friends, and it wasn’t something he could foresee at any point soon. They might be able to work out a trade agreement despite some stark differences.

 

The Vista was far to the north, past his influence. Having them show up on his doorstep a few months earlier hadn’t entirely been a surprise. They’d been hunting Rafe, Vance’s former partner-in-crime and fellow Gen En. Rafe had proven to be extremely violent, volatile and unpredictable. After years at odds with each other, Vance was resigned to his presence nearby, raiding and ransacking villages. Young, brash, and looking for revenge, the Vistans had accomplished in weeks what he hadn’t been able to do in a decade

 

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Renegades: Book 2 of The Wildblood

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01LYNY774

Available now at Amazon.

 

Author Info

  1. A. Hoag is an author, lapidary artist, very amateur astronomer (“I just look at the stars, I can’t tell you their names.”), hockey fan, and accidental desert-dweller. Born in the middle of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, she has lived in a number of cities, in a number of states, before crash-landing in the New Mexico desert. Not Roswell, however. Science Fiction has always been her first interest in reading and writing; many other genres sneak into the novels and that’s alright with her.

http://www.topaz08.com

 

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Other Books

 

The Wildblood Series

 

No one remembers what started the war, the big one. It happened too fast, and there were too many lies, for the truth to be known. Civilization stopped, and what came next was fueled by rage and fear.

Twenty years on, a tiny refuge, a place called The Vista, may be one of the last vestiges of humanity. Isolated, guarded, and hiding a dark secret, the people have survived World War Last, and they are content with that. Their children, however, are not. The search for others will send them out into a world they know nothing about, where the line between enemy and ally is blurred. The war may not be over.

 

Backlash, prequel to The Wildblood series. Before Team Three, there was the Blackout. Set on a near-future Earth mostly devoid of humans, this reveals some of the harsh realities facing people of The Vista, and how Team Three began.

When Security faces an unknown adversary that threatens to wreak havoc across what little civilization there is left, they must rely on the unusual abilities of a new team, and hope it’s enough to stop the chaos.

 

 

Before Team Three, there was The Blackout. Backlash, prequel to The Wildblood. Available in paperback now!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0104VMFI4

 

The Vista: Book 1 of The Wildblood introduces Team Three – Allen, MacKenzie and Wade. An elite team of security officers, they’re young, ambitious, and at the forefront of a movement to discover what is beyond The Vista. They also believe they are genetically enhanced, Gen En, a practice outlawed long before they were born. Venturing beyond their valley draws the attention of someone dangerous, someone that shares their past and wants to control their future, or destroy them because of what they might be. The team decide to take the fight away from their home and end up finding new allies – and new enemies.

 

What happens, after the end of civilization? The Vista: Book 1 of The Wildblood. Also available in paperback.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00W6R8WNM

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Hunters Moon: An Urban Mythos Novella

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01DMCJ0LM

Lyra Alexander considers herself an archeologist, a job that normally wouldn’t be very dramatic or dangerous. The problem with her job, however, is that she studies vampires. And they aren’t too keen on being studied.

In this world, there are all kinds of creatures prowling in the night . . . Humans are no longer at the top of the food chain.

~ ~ ~ ~ ~

 

Author links – S. A. Hoag

Website – www.topaz08.com

FB Author’s Page – https://www.facebook.com/thewildbloodseries/

Amazon Author’s Page – http://www.amazon.com/S.-A.-Hoag/e/B00WARWIHY/

Blog – https://topaz08.wordpress.com/

Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com/topaz08/

 

Author Spotlight – Jesper Schmidt

wUfyOMQj_400x400About the Author

I have always loved creating and I suppose that if I was only allowed to choose two words to describe myself they would be, “Focused ambition.” Yet, the art of writing was something that lived a quiet life, in the back of my mind, for many years. It was a dormant desire and, like so many of our dreams, it was placed on a list of things to do later; you know, when time would allow it. And there I left it. Half-forgotten. For a long time.

I have a Finnish sauna to thank for eventually picking it up from that dusted corner and beginning to pour my focused ambition over it. Every summer my wife, two boys and I go to Finland and spend a couple of weeks trying to do as little as possible. In that cottage it is all about slowing down and recharging our batteries. The atmosphere is perfect for it. What it was exactly that sparked my authorship I cannot say for sure – maybe it was just slowing down that gave another perspective? Maybe I was just ready for it? Whatever it was, I am ever thankful that it happened when it did back in 2015. Why wait when you can act today?

Follow me on social media.
YouTube
Facebook

Patreon

Learn more about me and my work at www.jesperschmidt.com.

Desolation

2016-580-3d-render-book-transparent-background-181x300“Desolation” is the first book in the fantasy trilogy, “The Keystone Bone”. It’s not for the faint-hearted, but if you like fast-paced fantasy, with dragons, demons, and magic, then you will love “Desolation”.

About This Book

Just as Aea had finally found happiness in her troubled life, everything starts to fall apart. When she discovers that her sister, Isota, is still alive, Aea ventures to save her, well aware that every Duian who leaves the forest realm of Thaduin will inevitably catch a deadly disease, the Field Blight. Aea finds herself in a race against time.

Arkum’Sul really wants nothing but to be left alone. Being the sole survivor of his race, and the son of a dragon god, makes such desires difficult to fulfill.

Meanwhile, Ayida, another Duian, resides in the Bronze Tower, far north of Thaduin, where she has grown to become a powerful spellcaster. However, it requires all of her skills to heal herself of the Field Blight daily. This place is the heart of the Magio Order, a dominant organization of female magic-wielders, where Ayida has tried for decades to ascend from Apprentice to the rank of Sienna… and failed every time. As she makes another attempt, all goes horribly wrong.

Will the world of Erisdün survive as ancient myths and reality become one?

Get it today and experience a struggle like no other.

Fantasy Map Making

3d-render-book-transparent_altHave you ever struggled with map making? To make it compliant with the laws of nature? Or spent countless hours trying to understand geography?

About This Book

In this book we will cover:

Whether maps are important or not and tackle some of the common excuses for not developing one.

What you need to think about before you start your map in order not to make mistakes in later steps.

Discuss your different options for creating the map: from hand drawn over software to hiring a professional.

Sketching your map and making sure that we get the size of the world just right.

Adding continents by understanding how tectonic plates work.
Terraforming your world with the knowledge of how winds and the equator affect the climate.

After having added mountains and deserts, we will include islands and lakes.

And then we make sure that rivers are not breaking the laws of nature.

We add trees, before moving into understanding how the lands will affect the people who live on them and vice versa.
It is then time for countries, borders, and roads.

We then finish up with optional fantasy elements and include the last touches.

Get it today, and design your own world.